Teaching

Philosophy of Teaching

The goals of the education and information fields are to provide individuals with access to knowledge and the skills needed to learn, stay informed, and be successful in their pursuits, whatever they may be.  My responsibility as an educator is not only to equip students with the skills to excel as future librarians, teachers, information professionals, or researchers, but to also instill a genuine desire to help and empower others.  This statement briefly describes the learning environments I try to facilitate, the coursework I develop and assign, and my instructional style.

I think exposure to new and different perspectives and cultures are critically important for preparing culturally competent learners.  I strive for my classrooms, whether online or offline, to be safe, inclusive environments where diverse students of all backgrounds feel welcomed and comfortable discussing their experiences and perspectives.  Issues related to diversity and social justice permeate all contexts of information work and, as such, I think it is important to address these issues in all of my courses so students have additional opportunities to develop their own cultural competencies and learn how to advocate for social change and justice.

I use practical assignments that give my students the chance to create products that will be beneficial in both their current positions and future careers.  The students in my IT Project Management class worked in small groups on projects that are either proposed by the students themselves or sponsored by companies or organizations in the community.  In my International Literature for Children and Young Adults course, students have the opportunity to assess their local library’s collections and make recommendations to diversify their collections with culturally authentic and accurate media.  Similarly, educators and information professionals must be able to successfully communicate and collaborate with diverse individuals, both as co-workers, students, and users, in the workplace.  I use small group work in my classes to help ensure participation and encourage students to voice their opinions in a constructive and safe environment.  I also like to include a reflexive, retrospective piece to the final projects in my courses to allow students to think critically and candidly about what they have learned and how they have applied it as well as how they might do better in the future.

I think that interactive and entertaining lectures that leverage various types of media are the best ways to engage students and inspire learning in the classroom.  My class slides are punctuated with humorous memes that not only break up the material but also provide a fun way for the students to engage with the topic outside of the classroom context.  When appropriate, I use video clips as jumping-off points for classroom-wide debates or small group discussions.  A favorite in IT project management course is a clip from the old show Pentagon Wars that I use to introduce a class discussion about scope creep.

I also integrate games into my lessons and activities.  The immersive quality of games helps to engage the audience through multiple channels and can provide interesting ways to introduce concepts, apply knowledge, and develop useful skills in a fun and safe environment where it is okay to fail.  For example, to illustrate the differences in risk strategies (risk-seeking, risk-neutral, and risk-averse) in my IT project management course, I used the disease simulation game Plague Inc.  While a bit unconventional, and perhaps morbid, the result was a well-received and memorable way to interactively demonstrate different approaches to risk management.  I also stream through Twitch.tv to take my Multicultural and International Literature classes on virtual field trips to explore diverse games, such as Never Alone, a platforming game developed in collaboration with Alaska Native elders and storytellers.

As a committed lifelong learner, my teaching philosophy will continue to evolve the more I teach, conduct research, and get feedback along the way.

Teaching Interests

  • Diverse Youth Literature and Collection Development
  • Digital Youth Resources and Services
  • Reader’s Advisory and Reference Services
  • Digital Literacy Instruction and Virtual Learning Environments
  • Game-Based Learning and Game Studies
  • User and Community Experiences
  • Research Methods and Ethics
  • Internet Studies, Digital Cultures, and Online Communities
  • New Media and Emerging Technologies
  • LIS/IT Professional Development

Teaching Experience at Pusan National University

Undergraduate Level

  • Information Entrepreneurship – Fall 2017
  • Information Materials for Science and Technology – Fall 2017
  • Information Search Methods – Fall 2017
  • Introduction to Educational Media – Spring 2017
  • Introduction to Information Systems – Spring 2017
  • Seminar in Library, Archives, and Information Studies (Gaming in Libraries) – Spring 2017

Teaching Experience at Florida State University

Courses taught as Adjunct Professor/Teaching Faculty I or Graduate Lead Instructor

Graduate Level

  • International Literature for Children and Young Adults – Summer 2016
  • Multicultural Literature and Information Resources for Children and Young Adults – Summer 2015

Undergraduate Level

  • IT Project Management – Fall 2016, Spring 2015, Fall 2014

Courses served as a Teaching Assistant

Graduate Level

  • Management of Information Organizations – Fall 2015
  • Graphic Novels in Libraries (Co-developed with Don Latham, PhD) – Summer 2014, Summer 2013, Summer 2012
  • Design & Production of Networked Multimedia – Fall 2012
  • Introduction to Information Technology – Summer 2012
  • Information Needs of Young Adults – Spring 2012

Undergraduate Level

  • Perspectives on Information Technology  – Spring 2013, Fall 2012, Spring 2012, Fall 2011

Teaching Honors

  • S-Ranking, Spring 2017, Pusan National University
  • Outstanding Graduate Lead Instructor, 2015, School of Information at FSU
  • Alternate, 2014 iSchool Inclusion Institute (i3) Teaching Fellowship
  • Outstanding Teaching Assistant, 2013, School of Library & Information Studies at FSU
  • Panelist, 6/18/2013, Teaching Assistant Bootcamp, School of Library & Information Studies at FSU

Invited Lectures

  • Hollister, J. M. (2017). Manga & manhwa:  An introduction to Japanese and Korean Comics and Graphic Novels.  Class lecture developed for a graduate level course, Graphic Novels in Libraries, School of Information, Florida State University. Presented on 7/12/2017.
  • Hollister, J. M. (2017). Exploring the digital literacy practices and information worlds of an online role-playing community using a hybrid ethnographic approach.  Class lecture developed for an undergraduate level course, Research and Data Analysis in Information Technology, School of Information, Florida State University.  Presented on 7/11/2017.
  • Hollister, J. M. (2016).  Getting into character:  Digital literacy practices and online role-playing.  Presentation developed for International Game Day 2016 at the Goldstein Library, School of Information, Florida State University. Presented on 11/18/2016.
  • Hollister, J. M. (2016).  Introduction to diverse literature for youth.  Class lecture developed for a graduate level course, Information Needs of Young Adults.  School of Information, Florida State University.  Presented on 11/14/2016.
  • Hollister, J. M. (2016).  Gaming the system(s):  Digital literacies in dystopian young adult literature & games.  Class lecture developed for an undergraduate level course, Introduction to Information Science.  School of Information, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL.  Presented on 9/28/2016.
  • Hollister, J. M. (2015). Take the power back: Games, digital literacies, & dystopian
    young adult literature. Class lecture developed for graduate-level courses,
    Information Needs of Young Adults & Seminar in the Historical Foundations of Library and Information Science. School of Information, Florida State
    University, Tallahassee, FL. Presented on 9/28/2015 & 11/19/2015.
  • Hollister, J. M. (2014). Manga & anime advisory.  Class lecture developed for Master’s level course, Graphic Novels in Libraries.  School of Information, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL. Presented 7/2/2014. 
  •  Hollister, J. M. (2014/2013). Manhwa:  An introduction to Korean graphic novels. Class lecture developed for Master’s level course, Graphic Novels in Libraries.  School of Information, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL. Presented 7/9/2013; Updated and presented on 7/9/2014.
  • Hollister, J. M. (2013). Anime advisory.  Class lecture developed for Master’s level course, Graphic Novels in Libraries.  School of Library & Information Studies, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL. Presented 7/2/2013.
  • Hollister, J. M.  (2012). Manga & manhwa:  An introduction to Japanese and Korean graphic novels.  Class lecture developed for Master’s level course, Graphic Novels.  School of Library & Information Studies, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL. Presented 7/7/2012 & 9/25/2012.
  • Hollister, J.M.  (2012). Graphic novels, film, & digital games.  Class lecture developed for Master’s level course, Graphic Novels.  School of Library & Information Studies, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL. Presented 7/30/2012.
  • Hollister, J. M. (2011).  Graphic novels & reader’s advisory.  Class lecture. School of Library & Information Studies, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL,  Presented 11/30/2011, 2/28/2012, & 4/4/2012.
  • Hollister, J. M. (2011).  The Goldstein Library: Collections and services. Guest lecture. School of Library & Information Studies, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL. Presented 5/17/2011 & 5/19/2011.
  • Hollister, J. M. (2010).  What is the FSU CCI ALA Student Chapter? Guest lecture. School of Library & Information Studies, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL. Presented 9/30/2010.